1683 London Pharmacopeia Culpeper HERBAL Alchemy Poor Medicine Pharmacy Unicorns

FREART, Roland

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“No man ought to commit his life into the hands of that Physician, who is ignorant of Astrologic: because he is a Physician of no value.” 

― Nicholas Culpeper

 

Nicholas Culpeper was a 17th-century English herbalist and physician known for his principal work “The English Physician”. Culpeper wanted medical treatments to be more accessible to everyone, including the poor. He intended to educate them on their health and provided explanations of these herbs and their medical, healing properties. Culpeper offers a cure for venereal disease in wormwood and intestinal worms to cure drunkenness! (Adams, p. 17)

 

He was responsible for translating important herbal texts such as the ‘London Pharmacopaeia’ from the original Latin. During the English Civil War, physicians were unable to enforce their ban on publication of medical texts and Culpeper decided to publish his translation as a medical ‘self-help’ guide. He believed that medical knowledge should be a public right rather than a profitable secret, and with the help of ‘London Pharmacopaeia,’ his was able to achieve his goals.

 

‘Heirs of Hippocrates’ on this work:

“The English medical profession was shocked and angered in 1649 when Culpeper published and English translation of the Latin pharmacopeia. This unauthorized translation outraged the College of Physicians, and they declared that Culpeper had infringed upon their rights because they held a monopoly on their official dispensatory. The fact that all their secret remedies were now easily read in the vernacular was a matter of great concern, and Culpeper was subjected to many bitter attacks”

$950.00

In stock

Free shipping wordwide!


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1683 London Pharmacopeia Culpeper HERBAL Alchemy Poor Medicine Pharmacy Unicorns

 

“No man ought to commit his life into the hands of that Physician, who is ignorant of Astrologic: because he is a Physician of no value.” 

― Nicholas Culpeper

 

Nicholas Culpeper was a 17th-century English herbalist and physician known for his principal work “The English Physician”. Culpeper wanted medical treatments to be more accessible to everyone, including the poor. He intended to educate them on their health and provided explanations of these herbs and their medical, healing properties. Culpeper offers a cure for venereal disease in wormwood and intestinal worms to cure drunkenness! (Adams, p. 17)

 

He was responsible for translating important herbal texts such as the ‘London Pharmacopaeia’ from the original Latin. During the English Civil War, physicians were unable to enforce their ban on publication of medical texts and Culpeper decided to publish his translation as a medical ‘self-help’ guide. He believed that medical knowledge should be a public right rather than a profitable secret, and with the help of ‘London Pharmacopaeia,’ his was able to achieve his goals.

 

‘Heirs of Hippocrates’ on this work:

“The English medical profession was shocked and angered in 1649 when Culpeper published and English translation of the Latin pharmacopeia. This unauthorized translation outraged the College of Physicians, and they declared that Culpeper had infringed upon their rights because they held a monopoly on their official dispensatory. The fact that all their secret remedies were now easily read in the vernacular was a matter of great concern, and Culpeper was subjected to many bitter attacks”

 

Item number: #7010

Price: $950

Note: Contents include the medicinal properties of both a Unicorn’s hornand the Skull of Man.

FREART, Roland

Pharmacopoeia londinensis: or, The London dispensatory further adorned by the studies and collections of the fellows now living, of the said College: in this impression you may find, 1. Three hundred useful additions. 2. All the notes that were in the margent are brought into the book… 3. The vertues, qualities, and properties of every simple. 4. The vertues and use of the compounds. 5. Cautions in giving all medicines that are dangerous. 6. All the medicines that were in the old Latin dispensatory, and are left out in the new Latin one, are printed in this impression in English, with their vertues. 7. A key to Galen and Hippocrates … 8. In this impression, the Latin name of every one of the compounds is printed …

London: Printed for Hanna Sawbridge…, 1683.

Details:

  • Collation: Complete with all pages

o   [16], 269 (i.e. 305), [43]

  • References: Wing C 7536; Adams, Hideous Absinthe; Wellcome II, 414; Krivatsy 2992; Hirsch-H. II, 154; Heirs of Hippocrates, 320, 321; Cushing C 624;
  • Language: English
  • Binding: Leather; tight & secure

o   Visible repair at front inner hinge

  • Size: ~6.75in X 4.5in (17cm x 11.5cm)

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7010

Categories

Botany, Gardening, & Herbals

European History

Medicine & Science

Authors

FREART, Roland

Printing Date

17th Century

Language

English

Binding

Leather

Book Condition

Excellent

Collation

Complete